Nook Lane Junior School Subject Overviews - History

Vision

At Nook Lane Junior School we endeavour for our children to receive high-quality history lessons that enable them to gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain's past, of the wider world and our local community. We aim to inspire children and to ignite their curiosity so that they ask questions about the past, investigate and interpret evidence, and grow enquiring minds.

We want pupils to think critically, to share their own ideas and to communicate in a variety of different ways using a well-developed historical vocabulary. We encourage children to consider the impact of different and diverse cultures from the past and question what we can learn from them as well as from the qualities and achievements of significant individuals. We want children to show a respect for, and understanding of, how these events and historical figures have changed the course of history, our own lives and our community.

Intent

At Nook Lane Junior School, we aspire to help children develop as historians, building progressively each year on the following history key intentions:

H1  Develop a sense of chronology across British, local and World history and talk with confidence about the past referring to historical terms, dates and periods, whilst noting connections, contrasts and trends over time.
H2  Be knowledgeable about a range of diverse individuals who have been influential and significant.
H3  Acquire the necessary skills to investigate and interpret events from the past using a range of sources of evidence that address questions, some of which they devise themselves.
H4  Reflect on, and be inspired by, events that have taken place in the past and discuss how they have impacted on our lives today.
H5  Recall, select and organise historical knowledge and understanding to communicate events from the past.
H6  Develop a progressive historical vocabulary that grows confidence when expressing ideas and opinions.

Key Concepts

Throughout their learning, children will develop an in-depth understanding of the following concepts that are continually returned to and discussed within each unit of learning so they can answer the 'bigger questions' listed below:

  1. Chronology - What is the chronological narrative of the history that we have studied?
  2. Influence and significance - How have significant people been influencial in the past? Why were these people so significant?
  3. Continuity and change; similarity and difference - What are the key changes or aspects of continuity that took place in the history that we have studies and how are some periods of history similar and different?
  4. Cause and effect - What were the reasons for events happening in the past and what was the impact of these events?

History Key Intentions and Concepts

 

 

 

 

  Our History key intentions
  and concepts are captured
  within our History Logo.

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation

  • Units of study that are a requirement of the national curriculum have been mapped-out to be studied in chronological order:
    • Year 3 study changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age; achievements of the earliest civilizations (Ancient Egyptians) and a local History Study (The Sheffield Flood)
    • Year 4 study Ancient Greece - a study of Greek life and achievements and their influences on the Western world; the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain and a non-European society that provides contrast with British History (The Mayans)
    • Year 5 study Britain's settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots and the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England
    • Year 6 study an aspect or theme in Britain history that extends children historical knowledge beyond 1066: How Britain stood firm against the German invasion during World War II (Extended study)
  • Key knowledge, skills and understanding are identified at the start of each history unit of work that link back to our key intentions, ensuring that all they key intentions are covered at least once within each history unit of work.
  • Children return to key concepts in each History unit to build knowledge around, and aid, long term memory.
  • All history lessons are designed to link to at least one of our history key intentions.
  • Lessons are thoughtfully sequenced with opportunities to complete memory mats each lesson helping children to revise key learning, including events, dates and vocabulary, each week to help children commit learning to their long-term memory.
  • Historical skills are mapped-out progressively within each year group ensuring that children make progress in their skillset year-on-year.

Impact

  • Children develop an excellent sense of chronology across British, local and world history so they can talk with confidence about the past referring to historical terms, dates and periods, whilst noting connections, contrasts and trends over time.
  • Children can talk with confidence about significant individuals that have brought about important change within the period of History in which they have lived. They can make comparisons and discuss similarities between these people.
  • Children have the knowledge and skills to investigate and interpret events from the past using a range of sources of evidence that address questions, some of which children devise themselves, about change, cause, similarity, difference and significance.
  • Children have inquiring minds and they confidently describe and explain events form the past constructing informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Children can talk about a range of sources that they have investigated, understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed.
  • Children empathise with, and have a respect for, the past, reflecting on events that have taken place and understanding how they have impacted on their own lives and how they live.
  • Children will develop an in-depth understanding of the following concepts that are continually returned to and discussed within each unit of learning so they can answer the 'bigger questions' listed below:
  1. Chronology - What is the chronological narrative of the history that we have studied?
  2. Influence and significance - How have significant people been influencial in the past? Why were these people so significant?
  3. Continuity and change; similarity and difference - What are the key changes or aspects of continuity that took place in the history that we have studies and how are some periods of history similar and different?
  4. Cause and effect - What were the reasons for events happening in the past and what was the impact of these events?

Overview of Learning

Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2
Year 3 Ancient Egyptian civilisation and achievements Victorian Christmas Local History linked to the Sheffield Flood in 1864   Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age  
Year 4 Ancient Greece - A study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world   The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain   Ancient Mayan civilisation
Year 5     Britain's settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots Viking & Anglo-Saxon struggle for the kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor.    
Year 6 Significant events that happened in WW2 and their impact on Britain.        

Example History unit overview - an example of a unit of work, showing our sequencing and progression as well as links to key concepts and vocabulary.

Example History Unit Overview

Example History unit overview - an example of a unit of work, showing the sequencing and progression as well as links to key concepts and vocabulary.

Curriculum

Our Curriculum: History subject booklet gives full details of:

  • National Curriculum, and
  • Subject Progression

Download it and take a look!

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